Welcome to the LTLF Forest Forum.
Page 13 of 18 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 ... LastLast
Results 301 to 325 of 446
  1. #301
    Grenville Morris
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    29,575

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Project Zeus View Post
    Eh, fuck him. I've gone for 8 different cryptos, all with demonstrable utility, which should therefore make them relatively secure in the long run from that bellend's attempts to manipulate the market.

    I doubt all 8 will "make it", but if 1 does it'll be a good return!

    Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
    FTFY.

    30/09/2021: It's only 8 points to the play-offs. Doesn't matter if we're 20th having lost three times as many games as we've won so far. I fancy us now that Hughton's gone.

  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many

  3. #302
    First Team
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Nottingham/Lincoln
    Posts
    9,564

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Planning to strategically invest a healthy amount per month for the next 48 months into 5-7 funds via an S&S ISA as part of building up a pot to increase the deposit on my next house, as an alternative to overpaying on my current mortgage.

    Any ideas of interesting funds I could have a look at whilst planning it?


  4. #303
    13th Duke of Wybourne
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    knee deep in clunge
    Posts
    48,711

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    MyBackPocket

    *investments may go down*

    "Ive only met Andy....last week actually and can confirm he is in 2nd place in sexiest fucker on here stakes." -Barry

  5. #304
    First Team
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Nottingham/Lincoln
    Posts
    9,564

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by OK SpidermAndy! View Post
    MyBackPocket

    *investments may go down*
    If Iíve told you once Iíve told you a thousand times, Iím not going down on you


  6. #305
    13th Duke of Wybourne
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    knee deep in clunge
    Posts
    48,711

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    If Iíve told you once Iíve told you a thousand times, Iím not going down on you
    OK, I'll stop asking, while you're here though does this handkerchief smell like chloroform to you?


  7. #306
    First Team
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Nottingham/Lincoln
    Posts
    9,564

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by OK SpidermAndy! View Post
    OK, I'll stop asking, while you're here though does this handkerchief smell like chloroform to you?



  8. #307
    13th Duke of Wybourne
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    knee deep in clunge
    Posts
    48,711

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread




  9. #308
    LTLF Legend
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Lufthansa Business Lounge
    Posts
    100,032

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Just take all your money out in cash, and blow it on girls and booze.

    ĄI believe in socialism because it seems more humanitarian, rather than every man for himself and 'I'm alright jack' and all those arsehole businessmen with all the loot. I made up my mind from viewing society from that angle. That's where I'm from and there's where I've made my decisions from. That's why I believe in socialismď

    ĄDon't forget you're alive. 'Cause sometimes when you walk around the city and you're in a bad mood, you can think, hey, wait a minute, we're alive! We don't know what the next second will bring and what a fantastic thing this is. This can get easily forgotten in the routine of life, and that's something I'm trying to bring to my attention at all times. Don't forget you're alive. We're not dead, you know. This is the greatest thing.Ē

    ó Joe Strummer

  10. #309
    Grenville Morris
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    29,575

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Planning to strategically invest a healthy amount per month for the next 48 months into 5-7 funds via an S&S ISA as part of building up a pot to increase the deposit on my next house, as an alternative to overpaying on my current mortgage.

    Any ideas of interesting funds I could have a look at whilst planning it?
    I'm not an IFA, this doesn't constitute financial advice.

    Sort of depends on what happens with global economic recovery and inflation once COVID stops dictating policies and instead becomes something that just is.

    If recovery is strong and inflation continues to pick up then central banks might get forced into raising interest rates. In that scenario you want to avoid speculative stocks, growth stocks, tech stocks, emerging markets, micro/small cap which do not do well in inflationary environments. Instead you'd want large cap stocks with predictable revenue/profit that can ride inflation and value (quality value) stocks - the latter of which probably means avoiding market-cap weighted US funds which are dominated by tech stocks. There's no one fund that stands out in terms of these criteria but you can find plenty of funds that have a value tilt, and if you look under the hood they should be chocked full of banks, insurers, consumer staples and some healthcare stocks (traditional players like GSK rather than newer players).

    If recovery is weak and inflation low so market rates are also kept low then it's the opposite way round - speculative, tech, growth, micro/small cap all become more investable because cost of capital is low. The in-vogue fund for this would be Scottish Mortgage Trust.

    If you really wanted to dial up the risk you could also look at individual stocks. Range of outcomes increases massively if you go down this route so you could end up with large losses but equally could end up with large gains. There are some UK stocks I think which offer compelling investment stories that might be worth having a small proportion of your money directly in. These are:

    1) M&G - an insurance/wealth management firm that divested from Prudential a couple of years ago. P/E ratio at 5 is incredibly low, dividend yield is 7.5% currently and likely to rise.
    2) Boohoo - revenues growing 25%+ annually and pandemic will have introduced more people to their services, but the stock trades at same price as it did before COVID because of their slave labour supply chain issues. That's been addressed but still narrative rumbles on, but it won't forever and eventually the stock price will reflect the fundamentals.
    3) BAE - P/E ratio of 13 isn't a bargain but it's still cheap, and BAE have as closed to guaranteed revenues as you're going to get from a private company and automation technology will likely usher in new era of countries wanting autonomous weapons. Dividend yield 4.5% currently.
    4) BAT/Imperial Brands - Low P/E ratios, stable cash-flow generation, and volume of smokers continue to rise even despite sentiment shifting because of population growth. 7-8% div yields possible.
    5) Banks - inflation play. If central banks raise interest rates then private banks tend to benefit as spread they can lend out at increases. Bank stocks are still anywhere between 50% and 80% down from their 2008 peaks because interest rates been so low for so long. At some point that is going to unwind - it's just a matter of time. Perhaps worth a bet it occurs in the next four years?

    Disclaimer: I hold M&G, Boohoo, BAE, Lloyds and Barclays. M&G is my #1 holding in terms of value, but I invested quite a lot last year when it sold off 50% and what was already a bargain stock became a complete and utter no brainer. It's now back to it's pre-COVID levels so not a no brainer but still a bargain imo. I don't own any cigarette makers but have considered it as have some cash sitting idle I don't know what to do with.

    Last edited by MaxiRobriguez; 02-07-21 at 14:55.

  11. #310
    It's all about mid-table...
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wetherspoons
    Posts
    20,945

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Strummer View Post
    Just take all your money out in cash, and blow it on girls and booze.
    THIS !


  12. #311
    Viv Anderson
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Fterno, Lefkada
    Posts
    15,582

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    It's alright we don't need Maxi anymore. People are taking financial advice from Katie Price.
    https://www.irishmirror.ie/showbiz/c...ation-24656793

    Sent from my M2003J15SC using Tapatalk


  13. #312
    Grenville Morris
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    29,575

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Boris set to announce a 1% rise in National Insurance tax to pay for social care.

    Could have added it to capital gains or dividend taxes to target those more well off, like Boris and his cronies.
    Could have added it to income tax to not deliberately miss out pensioners from the tax hike, pensioners who as a cohort are already hogging significant amount of national wealth.
    Could have added it onto stamp duty to help reverse the disasterous stamp duty cut of the last year which has made housing even more unaffordable.

    But no, in a surprise to absolutely no one who hasn't been suckered into these ***** lies, they've added the burden onto workers, and added it to an already regressive tax.

    LEVELLING UP.

    Last edited by MaxiRobriguez; 03-09-21 at 10:46.

  14. #313
    Grenville Morris
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    29,575

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Trying not to bring politics into this thread but god damn it's hard not to bash the Tories.

    Anyway, for those of us who still work and pay NI - if you're in a defined contribution salary sacrifice pension scheme at your workplace you can dodge (most of) this tax hike by increasing your pension contribution. It will reduce your take home pay so can only really be done by people with a bit of money left over at the end of every month, however if you can then you can dodge what will now be 33% tax rate (20% income, 13% NI) for basic rate tax payers and 43% (40% income, 3% NI) for higher rate taxpayers.

    When you draw your pension you will only be paying 20% income tax, so the net impact of the pension contribution is to have 13%+ more of your money that you can access at age 55 (set to rise to 58 shortly).

    So - anyone who is early 50's, perhaps even mid 40's, it makes sense to sacrifice as much into your pension as possible as your horizon to accessing that money is quite short. Even if it creates cash flow problems now, if you can get over that by freeing equity from a mortgage for example, which will cost you about 3% at current rates for a 10 year fix, then you're already 10% better off.

    NB: Assuming no one reading these suggestions will be close to hitting the life time allowance rate (just a smidge over £1m at the moment). Anyone closing in on that, the benefit of additional pension contributions is significantly reduced.


  15. #314
    Viv Anderson
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    JLB Credit
    Posts
    10,795

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by MaxiRobriguez View Post
    Boris set to announce a 1% rise in National Insurance tax to pay for social care.

    Could have added it to capital gains or dividend taxes to target those more well off, like Boris and his cronies.
    Could have added it to income tax to not deliberately miss out pensioners from the tax hike, pensioners who as a cohort are already hogging significant amount of national wealth.
    Could have added it onto stamp duty to help reverse the disasterous stamp duty cut of the last year which has made housing even more unaffordable.

    But no, in a surprise to absolutely no one who hasn't been suckered into these ***** lies, they've added the burden onto workers, and added it to an already regressive tax.

    LEVELLING UP.
    It's not like the Tories to disproportionately target the young.

    Their own manifesto in 2019 stated that they would not increase NI tax. Once again they're taking their voters for complete and utter mugs.

    Even Jeremy Hunt is criticising the government for not raising income tax instead.

    Of course, the BBC aren't even reporting on it whatsoever

    Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk


  16. #315
    Nigel Clough
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    5,764

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    The Conservatives love shitting on the low paid.

    I'm assuming the proceeds from this tax rise, sorry 'health levy', will end up in the pockets of a Tory donor who runs a string of dodgy care homes


  17. #316
    LTLF Legend
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Lufthansa Business Lounge
    Posts
    100,032

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    I am just confused why the Tories see the need to jack-up National Insurance though; surely the £350m a week Brexit dividend will cover these additional costs?

    Anyone would think the donít want to levy more income tax because that would disproportionately affect those older, mainly pensioner, voters, who are die-hard Tory voters?

    Or something.


  18. #317
    Viv Anderson
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    JLB Credit
    Posts
    10,795

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    There's a certain irony to the generation that gave us Thatcher and small government now wanting workers to bear the cost of their own social care now they're elderly. When they hold vastly disproportionate levels of wealth.

    Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk


  19. #318
    Grenville Morris
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    29,575

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Rise in National Insurance Contributions of 1.25% has been confirmed which will whack on £200 extra tax a year for most of us on this forum.

    There's also a surprise equivalent rise in the dividend tax rate, rising from 7.5% or 32% (basic rate/higher rate tax payers) to 8.75% or 33.25% respectively.

    Big winners are pensioners with modest assets. Currently any retiree with assets over £23k is expected to fully fund their care, whereas from 2023 that changes so that assets worth £20k through to £100k will receive some state support, with only those with over £100k having to fully fund their care.


  20. #319
    Viv Anderson
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    'ull
    Posts
    14,666

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by MaxiRobriguez View Post
    Rise in National Insurance Contributions of 1.25% has been confirmed which will whack on £200 extra tax a year for most of us on this forum.

    There's also a surprise equivalent rise in the dividend tax rate, rising from 7.5% or 32% (basic rate/higher rate tax payers) to 8.75% or 33.25% respectively.

    Big winners are pensioners with modest assets. Currently any retiree with assets over £23k is expected to fully fund their care, whereas from 2023 that changes so that assets worth £20k through to £100k will receive some state support, with only those with over £100k having to fully fund their care.
    How does this affect Bryn’s cash in hand shoe box under his bed


  21. #320
    LTLF Legend
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Lufthansa Business Lounge
    Posts
    100,032

    Default The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by MaxiRobriguez View Post
    There's also a surprise equivalent rise in the dividend tax rate, rising from 7.5% or 32% (basic rate/higher rate tax payers) to 8.75% or 33.25% respectively.
    Now, that, I did not expect to see.

    Given the propensity of those higher up the food chain to take more in dividends than in salary, that was unexpected, and not - I have to admit - unwelcome.

    It would have been grossly unfair not to levy a corresponding increase there.


  22. #321
    Grenville Morris
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    29,575

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Strummer View Post
    Now, that, I did not expect to see.

    Given the propensity of those higher up the food chain to take more in dividends than in salary, that was unexpected, and not - I have to admit - unwelcome.

    It would have been grossly unfair not to levy a corresponding increase there.
    I sort of agree but dividend as a share of remuneration has been falling in recent years. You tend to find self-employed employ laddering where they take a variety of "salary", dividends and capital gains to minimise their tax burdens, where as those higher up the food chain who are capitalists rather than self-employed structure their ownership through tax efficient vehicles like off-shore havens for the super wealthy and pensions or S+S ISAs for the somewhat wealthy.

    In terms of taxing the rich, an increase on dividends is the least impactful of everything.

    But I guess something is better than nothing.


  23. #322
    LTLF Legend
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Lufthansa Business Lounge
    Posts
    100,032

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by MaxiRobriguez View Post
    I sort of agree but dividend as a share of remuneration has been falling in recent years. You tend to find self-employed employ laddering where they take a variety of "salary", dividends and capital gains to minimise their tax burdens, where as those higher up the food chain who are capitalists rather than self-employed structure their ownership through tax efficient vehicles like off-shore havens for the super wealthy and pensions or S+S ISAs for the somewhat wealthy.

    In terms of taxing the rich, an increase on dividends is the least impactful of everything.

    But I guess something is better than nothing.
    Yeah, exactly.

    Itís the least they could do, but I expected them to do nothing, so, thereís that, at least.


  24. #323
    Youth Team
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    262

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by MaxiRobriguez View Post
    I sort of agree but dividend as a share of remuneration has been falling in recent years. You tend to find self-employed employ laddering where they take a variety of "salary", dividends and capital gains to minimise their tax burdens, where as those higher up the food chain who are capitalists rather than self-employed structure their ownership through tax efficient vehicles like off-shore havens for the super wealthy and pensions or S+S ISAs for the somewhat wealthy.

    In terms of taxing the rich, an increase on dividends is the least impactful of everything.

    But I guess something is better than nothing.
    So much simpler and fairer to just put a bit extra on income tax.

    It'll also be interesting to see if they do anything with capital gains tax in the autumn budget. Been lots of chatter about that previously and also enforcing a flat rate of pension tax relief.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk


  25. #324
    Grenville Morris
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cloud Cuckoo Land
    Posts
    29,575

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Pippi View Post
    It'll also be interesting to see if they do anything with capital gains tax in the autumn budget. Been lots of chatter about that previously and also enforcing a flat rate of pension tax relief.
    Yeah the pension tax relief is the obvious candidate to nuke. Doesn't seem particularly fair that those who earn >£50k can effectively dodge 20% tax completely (as they'll only pay 20% in retirement) whereas those on average wages only get to defer their tax to retirement. Also many of those higher rate tax payers will be in salary sacrifice schemes which allows people to avoid NI as well, so the impact to the higher rate tax-payers will be 9% reduction on the tax they can dodge, but it's still very much worth doing.

    It's also unfair on the (financially) uneducated. I sacrifice a tonne into my pension and dip into mortgage when I need (got an offset) for cashflow purposes, knowing that investment gains over long term will outpace mortgage interest cost, so net benefit of doing that. It's not something most people would know how to exploit, let alone be able to consider the risks of that approach.

    TLDR: Find most things are set-up so that those well off and educated can benefit from them.


  26. #325
    Youth Team
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    262

    Default Re: The Big Finance, Money and Economics thread

    The timing of this is interesting. Why not wait until the Autumn budget? Surely they'd be hard pushed to announce further tax increases now in the Autumn budget (whether capital gains, or pension tax relief). Surely even Boris wouldn't be silly enough to put more tax increases into the Autumn budget so soon after - especially ones that go right to the heart of the tory vote?

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk


 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •