A week in politics

Dr Sheldon Cooper

Geoff Thomas
I have to come clean here:
1 I have several DB pensions from my working life, all of which are index linked to either RPI or CPI;
2 My State Pension is the strawberry jam, clotted cream and glass of champagne on top of my occupational pensions (the income from which just about cover my rather modest living style);
3 As an "older person" and one who hailed from a council house living, blue-collar family, I can honestly say other than a brief flirtation with the Tories under the early days of Thatcher, I have never voted Tory; rather than vote for a party candidate I have always considered the best candidate for the constituency, with a secondary eye to the manifesto of my preferred candidates party affiliation;
4 I do not need a 10% hike in my State Pension; it isn't going to change my life, and it certainly isn't going to make me vote Tory any time soon (ever), however, no-one in government thought to ask me whether I had need of the 10%.
5 Will I donate the 10% to charity? Possibly, but as I already have a charity donation budget, I shall not donate all of it.
There was a simple solution to the pension triple lock situation (yes, you can complicate it with all sorts of crafty personal financial engineering), and that would be to only award the inflation bit to pensioners in receipt of State Pension top up.
This would be seen by the Tories as pandering to the ne'er-do-wells in society, who the Tories would accuse of wasting the opportunities of education and full-employment, and reduce the potency of the bribe factor.
I was in a DB pension for the first 14 years of my working life paying in on average 2% of my salary matched by my company. Its went tits up and got bailed out by the Labour government and frozen at 90%.

If I stay where I am till I retire I will have had 25 years paying 12% (6+6%) of a much higher salary into a DC pension and even then it won't touch the frozen DB pension. DC pensions are pretty shit.
 

Captain Sinister

Senior doom Monger
It's not legally allowed here either. The landlord was trying to pull a fast one.
Which bit(s) were ilegal, please? We fought off the first letter that tried to make out the initial contract was only for 10 months, so she got the full 12 months at the contracted rent. The new contract (take it or leave it) was for 10 months with an 11% hike in monthly rent.
 

MaxiRobriguez

Bob McKinlay
Which bit(s) were ilegal, please? We fought off the first letter that tried to make out the initial contract was only for 10 months, so she got the full 12 months at the contracted rent. The new contract (take it or leave it) was for 10 months with an 11% hike in monthly rent.
Then not got a leg to stand on I'm afraid. It sounded initially like the landlord had whacked up the rent mid-term when the contract said fixed rate.

Choice is to take up Landlord offer, negotiate it or simply find a different rental property. Personally if it was me I'd do the latter, as it sounds like the landlord is a complete nob who will just cause problem after problem for your daughter the longer she stays there.
 

Raymondo Ponte'

It's all about mid-table...
It's high time the Govt capped how many properties an individual can own.

There are certain wealthy folks sweeping up swathes of streets in parts of the UK.

That cant be right.
 

MaxiRobriguez

Bob McKinlay
I was in a DB pension for the first 14 years of my working life paying in on average 2% of my salary matched by my company. Its went tits up and got bailed out by the Labour government and frozen at 90%.

If I stay where I am till I retire I will have had 25 years paying 12% (6+6%) of a much higher salary into a DC pension and even then it won't touch the frozen DB pension. DC pensions are pretty shit.

I put in 28% of my salary (and my employer tops it up by 10% too) - and it's forecast to end up with a pot value that would be about the same as someone putting in 8% into a DB scheme over the same timeframe. So I have to put in 3x as much as 99% of current retirees did to get the same pension provision.

Frustrating but a necessity for me. I want to retire early, so need to build a generous pot to be able to give me even an average level of income for 40+ years because need a margin of safety with drawing it down (because yet again the DB scheme is better as it gives guaranteed, inflation linked income where as a DC pension does not, you're on your own with that one).
 
I'm keeping my old LGPS pension. The guaranteed pay makes a mockery of what almost any if pension scheme offers.

Got to look at the new works pension and what options I have there. All I know so far is it's with Aviva, at keast I think it is.
 

Dr Sheldon Cooper

Geoff Thomas
I put in 28% of my salary (and my employer tops it up by 10% too) - and it's forecast to end up with a pot value that would be about the same as someone putting in 8% into a DB scheme over the same timeframe. So I have to put in 3x as much as 99% of current retirees did to get the same pension provision.

Frustrating but a necessity for me. I want to retire early, so need to build a generous pot to be able to give me even an average level of income for 40+ years because need a margin of safety with drawing it down (because yet again the DB scheme is better as it gives guaranteed, inflation linked income where as a DC pension does not, you're on your own with that one).
yeah I might have to up my contributions so I can fuck the fuck off
 

Captain Sinister

Senior doom Monger
Then not got a leg to stand on I'm afraid. It sounded initially like the landlord had whacked up the rent mid-term when the contract said fixed rate.

Choice is to take up Landlord offer, negotiate it or simply find a different rental property. Personally if it was me I'd do the latter, as it sounds like the landlord is a complete nob who will just cause problem after problem for your daughter the longer she stays there.
Thanks.
 

MaxiRobriguez

Bob McKinlay
I'm keeping my old LGPS pension. The guaranteed pay makes a mockery of what almost any if pension scheme offers.

Got to look at the new works pension and what options I have there. All I know so far is it's with Aviva, at keast I think it is.

LGPS scheme is decent, default position should be to keep it like any other government DB scheme. Would need a very good reason to sell it, like a very large CETV multiplier for example. PM me if you want to discuss further Andy.
 

MaxiRobriguez

Bob McKinlay
yeah I might have to up my contributions so I can fuck the fuck off
It's the only thing that keeps me going with work sometimes, and the incessant internal politics and unrelenting pressure, the knowledge that at some point I am going to tell my superiors I'm fucking the fuck off at 50, and they will have to carry on with their pointless waste of time at the office for a little bit longer still, even though I'm a decade younger than them.
 

alabamared

Stuart Pearce
Which bit(s) were ilegal, please? We fought off the first letter that tried to make out the initial contract was only for 10 months, so she got the full 12 months at the contracted rent. The new contract (take it or leave it) was for 10 months with an 11% hike in monthly rent.
A fixed term rental agreement is exactly that. If you have a 12 month agreement the landlord cannot simply change it midstream. I assuming that you signed a fixed term tennancy agreement which spitualted 12 months? If there was no signed agreement and the landlord has accepted rent then you are in a stronger position as you become a different sort of tenant. Some landlords will try and play on the ignorance of renters and instill fear. TBH if you don't move when your fixed term agreement it could take a long time to evict the tenant.
All landlords are legally obliged to issue this document with every tennacy agreement (before signing) even if it is renewal this lays out the legal postion in full. If the landlord as not issued this at the correct point the courts will not look favourably on an eviction request https://assets.publishing.service.g...a/file/942503/6.6642_MHCLG_How_to_Rent_v5.pdf

Tenants ignorance of the law is the greatest weapon of the landlord without scruples.
 

alabamared

Stuart Pearce
Then not got a leg to stand on I'm afraid. It sounded initially like the landlord had whacked up the rent mid-term when the contract said fixed rate.

Choice is to take up Landlord offer, negotiate it or simply find a different rental property. Personally if it was me I'd do the latter, as it sounds like the landlord is a complete nob who will just cause problem after problem for your daughter the longer she stays there.
It's not as simple as that government rules on rent increases are as follows (direct quote)

  • the rent increase must be fair and realistic, which means in line with average local rents
In addition to that landlords have to give a minimum of one months notice of a rent increase.

There are some nasty landlords but not as many as the media would have you believe and alwys remember knowledge is power.
 

Lefkasman

Steve Chettle
When my mam was in private rented accommodation she regularly appealed against the increases. I don't think she ever won one appeal. It was a blessing when she got a housing association flat, plus she got repairs done.

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Lefkasman

Steve Chettle
It's high time the Govt capped how many properties an individual can own.

There are certain wealthy folks sweeping up swathes of streets in parts of the UK.

That cant be right.
It's gone on for years Ray. When my mam rented, 2 brothers bought the whole street. They knew it was mainly old folk so as they died off they moved the students in. Nottingham city council were always singing their praises and still do of one of them. He's been on many a all expenses paid trip paid for by the council . Apparently if you are on a flash boat moored next to other flash boats it good for city council business.

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benj360

First Team Squad
In other political news, Nottingham City Council are so hapless the government are taking over :lol:
Looks great on the national and international stage when we can’t even run our own affairs anymore! It’s been coming though what with all the various calamities (arguably more through the incompetence of the previous Labour administration than the current one it has to be said), which have all ultimately cost the taxpayer.
 
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