Welcome to the LTLF Forest Forum.
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 151 to 174 of 174

Thread: James McClean

      
  1. #151
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Findern, South Derbyshire.
    Posts
    6,736

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by lard View Post
    Brilliant feeling isn't it , My son was chosen a few years back for this proud moment
    .

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk
    One of our proudest moments being a parent.


  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Posts
    Many

  3. #152
    The Foam Hand
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Curry House
    Posts
    18,838

    Default Re: James McClean

    I'm sure we've all got a tale to tell here through family history and maybe turn the thread into a positive now the daft lad got booed for 90 minutes?

    My great grandfather on my mother's side was on the battle of the Somme. He survived through a bayonet injury.
    I vaguely remember him in the 1970's when I was a young un, he was the type of bloke that wore a waistcoat and shirt everyday. He had a strict routine; mouthwash with saltwater, two boiled eggs for breakfast, press-ups and exercises all early morning.
    He was born in West Bromwich and was a semi-pro boxer and footballer, he was on West Broms books.
    After WWI he eventually moved to Nottinghamshire for Mining work and decent pay, as many men did.
    His nickname here was Brummie Bill and he passed away at 72 years old

    Bout time Forest stopped ruining weekends. - Barry

  4. #153
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Shakey Wakey/Leeds Border
    Posts
    14,243

    Default Re: James McClean

    My grandad who passed away this year told me how during a prisoner of war the German farmers would throw vegetables at the feet of our troops as they marched from camp to camp to feed them , The vegetables were kicked to the back of the line so he could pick it up and share it later with his troop.
    Hats off to the German farmers for their humanity.

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk


  5. #154
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Wrexham
    Posts
    7,275

    Default Re: James McClean

    My great great uncle Harry and great great Uncle Tom both died in ww1. Apparently my grandad said his mum couldnít talk about Toms death till her dying day it upset her that much. Both sherwood foresters, Harry died at the Somme and Tom at neuve Chappelle Tom died in a German prisoner of war camp after being wounded by shrapnel near the German lines. The more we learned about it all the more we understood why Grandadís mum was so so heartbroken. WW1 feels even more gutwenching because everyone was naive to what warfare had advanced to. To all these poor sods it was an adventure they couldnít wait to go on. In fact if they couldnít go they were distraught, till they learnt the horrors of what was to come.

    It wasnít a war in vain they saved Belgium, France and Serbia. The most poingniant note of it all is the absolute selflessness of it all. We didnít have to save Belgium, France and Serbia and in doing so they made sure that we kept our freedom. Bless there souls and rest in peace, lest we forget for your tomorrow we gave our today.


  6. #155
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    15,274

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by lard View Post
    My grandad who passed away this year told me how during a prisoner of war the German farmers would throw vegetables at the feet of our troops as they marched from camp to camp to feed them , The vegetables were kicked to the back of the line so he could pick it up and share it later with his troop.
    Hats off to the German farmers for their humanity.

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk
    My father was German. He fought for Germany in the war, although he was only just 18, and flew gliders under radar to survey the land.

    He was captured in France. Held as a prisoner and frogmarched through France to the coast, abused, starved and stoned.

    There, he and 200 other prisoners, boarded open rafts and transported to England over the Channel.

    Arriving, cold, exhausted, his skin white from the sea salt, he was greeted by English WVS, welcomed with a smile, a hot cup of tea, a piece of bread, a cigarette and a bar of soap.

    It was the greatest act of humanity my father had ever witnessed before, during and after the war.

    My father lost family and friends and witnessed the death of many unnamed soldiers, English and German.

    He never spoke about it.

    Every year, he wore a poppy.

    'Intelligence without ambition is a bird without wings' - Salvador Dali 1904-1989

    I think 'odd' is a good thing. Oddness shows originality, uniqueness and a desire to be different from the masses. Oddness is, maybe, only deemed 'odd' by the majority who are considered less odd but only by their own blinkered observations and understanding. Oddness should never be criticised but be encouraged to nurture, develop individualism and to explore the mind rather than conform to expectation and 'normality'. Many of the world's greatest works of art and prose were born from those minds many considered to be 'odd'.
    [/url]

  7. #156
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    7,281

    Default James McClean

    This is the extract from the Grantham Journal , dadís dad wasnít 18 when he joined, he was 17. He survived the First World War because he could look after horses.




    Returned Prisoner - Pte Wm. Walters, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Chris. Williamson, with whom he makes his
    home, arrived from Germany on Monday. He was captured by the Germans on May 27th, at Rheims.
    He and his equally unfortunate comrades were formed up, made to lay their rifles flat on the ground. and hold their hands
    above their heads. One man getting tired of this position, lowered his arms somewhat, and was immediately shot.
    The German Officer then declared that, the English had been shooting with Dumdum and explosive bullets. On
    our officers denying this they were either shot or bayoneted. The German officer then ordered a machine gun to
    be turned upon the prisoners, but fortunately, another officer of higher rank came up and stopped this wholesale
    murder. The prisoners were then marched by some enemy cavalry for two days and two nights without food or
    drink. Walters was put into some stables to look after sick horses, his food consisting of a piece of black bread, about
    four inches square, and half-an-inch thick - a 24 hour ration (a sample of which he has brought home). It looks
    partly to consist of sawdust, and gives off an offensive smell. This was supplemented with an occasional bowl of
    cabbage and mangel soup. In July, he had to go into hospital, suffering from diphtheria and dysentery, and he is
    sure he would never have come out alive had he not been fairly well treated by a German sister, who before the war
    nursed for some years in a London hospital and in Bristol. One day Walters was ordered out of bed to help to carry in
    a wounded German, but he was so weak he was unable to stand, and fell down. A whip was immediately produced
    and, he was severely lashed. His grandmother has been sending 10s. per month to the Red Cross, from whom, no
    doubt, his four parcels were sent every month ; letters have also been sent twice a week, but since his capture neither
    parcels nor letters have reached him. He has seen plenty of our officers and men shot and bayoneted after capture,
    and also men who have had their hands or toes chopped off.
    Pte. Walters will require some very careful nursing to bring back his strength. He is very wasted and ill, but he must
    be congratulated in getting away with his life from such inhuman brutes. He joined up when 18 years of age and he
    is now 21. Everybody is pleased to see him again for he is very highly respected.

    Last edited by tiffany; 11-11-18 at 11:34.

  8. #157
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    7,281

    Default Re: James McClean



    And this is my maternal grandfather , taken in Arnhem , he was taken POW after this , a recurring theme and one of the reasons I didnít pursue a military career, seemed too likely I would be taken POW too.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


  9. #158
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Vale of Belvoir
    Posts
    14,805

    Default Re: James McClean

    I don't think we should let the decision not to wear a poppy by a fairly run-of-the mill footballer, should be allowed to distract from the genuine and heartfelt pride and sorrow that the vast majority feel with regards to the dead of all armed conflicts.
    McLean is best ignored - we should rise above it.


  10. #159
    Sexual Tyrannosaurus
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Behind you
    Posts
    40,652

    Default Re: James McClean

    I was quite surprised by how few had one on yesterday. Each to thier own though.

    War brings out the best and the worst in people. We can't imagine what people went through and what led to some of these incidents.

    "Ive only met Andy....last week actually and can confirm he is in 2nd place in sexiest fucker on here stakes." -Barry

  11. #160
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    5,627

    Default Re: James McClean

    Had a few serving members of family but I only met two, most had sadly passed away. Some as a consequence of war, some as a consequence of time.

    Great Grandad, Japanese PoW
    Grandad, Bonn post WW2.

    Great Grandad never spoke to me about him time away, I imagine it was because of my age. I've researched a bit about a PoWs experience and I've got nothing much else to say apart from my existence is largely based on luck.

    Grandad spent his time in and around tanks for some reason. He claimed he could drive one, but he never drove a car, so potentially one of his funny stories.

    Both of them died in the same week oddly enough. March 2006. I still find it odd living in a world without either of them. Both came from different sides of my family so records have been passed on to other members of my family. Once I'm settled and a bit older, I've always said that I'd like to go back and learn more about their time away and my other family members that I never got to meet.

    "They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
    Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
    At the going down of the sun, and in the morning
    We will remember them".


  12. #161
    Sexual Tyrannosaurus
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Behind you
    Posts
    40,652

    Default Re: James McClean

    As for war stories, my family was largely "lucky". Going through my family tree it seems most were to young or old to join up and if they were military age then most were in reserved occupations. There's very little other than that and not many stories around so god knows what they were up to. I did find a poor lad who died at Gallipoli in ww1, his names on the memorial there.

    My paternal grandmother's family was evacuated from Guernsey during ww2.


  13. #162
    The Foam Hand
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Curry House
    Posts
    18,838

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by T.B.T. View Post
    My father was German. He fought for Germany in the war, although he was only just 18, and flew gliders under radar to survey the land.

    He was captured in France. Held as a prisoner and frogmarched through France to the coast, abused, starved and stoned.

    There, he and 200 other prisoners, boarded open rafts and transported to England over the Channel.

    Arriving, cold, exhausted, his skin white from the sea salt, he was greeted by English WVS, welcomed with a smile, a hot cup of tea, a piece of bread, a cigarette and a bar of soap.

    It was the greatest act of humanity my father had ever witnessed before, during and after the war.

    My father lost family and friends and witnessed the death of many unnamed soldiers, English and German.

    He never spoke about it.

    Every year, he wore a poppy.
    My Polish grandmother eventually got re-married an ex German soldier.
    Her Polish husband died in a mining accident a few years after they came to England after WWII.
    She was lucky to survive a concentration camp, she wasn't Jewish but looked gypsy with olive skin and black hair.

    Her German husband was a strange man, quiet and difficult to talk to. He had a room full of radio equipment and I remember only seeing him as he was going to bed, he'd sleep in the day and talk to people on radio in German at night.
    My mum told me years later she thought he was some kind of spy.

    I used to dread going there, I'd have been about 7 years old before we stopped going. My Polish gran was very strict, I'd go up there wearing pumps and all the usual 70's kid off the estate clothing, then she'd take me somewhere like M&S and deck me out in smart trousers, shoes, shirt and one of those army jumpers. I hated it


  14. #163
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    DOGHOUSE
    Posts
    10,832

    Default Re: James McClean

    Dunno whether Stoke deliberated long & hard about playing him, if they did, they came to the wrong conclusion.

    He was fucking useless.


  15. #164
    The Foam Hand
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Curry House
    Posts
    18,838

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by MASE View Post
    Dunno whether Stoke deliberated long & hard about playing him, if they did, they came to the wrong conclusion.

    He was fucking useless.
    I thought he had a few decent spells but atmosphere got to him, he made some silly mistakes.


  16. #165
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Trent End
    Posts
    12,198

    Default Re: James McClean

    He had a Britt moment when we were booing him and he tripped over his own feet with nobody within 10 yards of him


  17. #166
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    'ull
    Posts
    9,517

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by T.B.T. View Post
    My father was German. He fought for Germany in the war, although he was only just 18, and flew gliders under radar to survey the land.

    He was captured in France. Held as a prisoner and frogmarched through France to the coast, abused, starved and stoned.

    There, he and 200 other prisoners, boarded open rafts and transported to England over the Channel.

    Arriving, cold, exhausted, his skin white from the sea salt, he was greeted by English WVS, welcomed with a smile, a hot cup of tea, a piece of bread, a cigarette and a bar of soap.

    It was the greatest act of humanity my father had ever witnessed before, during and after the war.

    My father lost family and friends and witnessed the death of many unnamed soldiers, English and German.

    He never spoke about it.

    Every year, he wore a poppy.
    This is a great story and makes me really proud of my nation. I'm not a massive patriot.

    On a similar note my Grandad fought in the Second World War in Africa and Italy to name two places. He was in the East Yorkshire regiment. After he got back from the War he married my Grandma and her best friend worked close to a local German POW camp and ended up marrying one of the German prisoners. It turned out that they had fought against each other in the battle of Monte Cassino. My Grandad and Helmut became really good friends and he was a regular drinking partner. They were born within a year of each other in different countries, had fought against each other, ended up marrying girls in the same small village and died a week apart. They are buried next to each other. Small world hey?

    Last edited by GOBIAS; 11-11-18 at 18:56.

  18. #167
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Shakey Wakey/Leeds Border
    Posts
    14,243

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryn Gunn View Post
    My Polish grandmother eventually got re-married an ex German soldier.
    Her Polish husband died in a mining accident a few years after they came to England after WWII.
    She was lucky to survive a concentration camp, she wasn't Jewish but looked gypsy with olive skin and black hair.

    Her German husband was a strange man, quiet and difficult to talk to. He had a room full of radio equipment and I remember only seeing him as he was going to bed, he'd sleep in the day and talk to people on radio in German at night.
    My mum told me years later she thought he was some kind of spy.

    I used to dread going there, I'd have been about 7 years old before we stopped going. My Polish gran was very strict, I'd go up there wearing pumps and all the usual 70's kid off the estate clothing, then she'd take me somewhere like M&S and deck me out in smart trousers, shoes, shirt and one of those army jumpers. I hated it
    I used to love my army jumper with the patches on the shoulders and elbows , Nice and warm

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk


  19. #168
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Shakey Wakey/Leeds Border
    Posts
    14,243

    Default Re: James McClean

    From one son to another the younger one today in Wakefield .

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk


  20. #169
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    'ull
    Posts
    9,517

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by lard View Post
    I used to love my army jumper with the patches on the shoulders and elbows , Nice and warm

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk
    Probably still the height of fashion in Yorkshire!!


  21. #170
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    26,182

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by lard View Post
    From one son to another the younger one today in Wakefield .

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk
    Quote Originally Posted by GOBIAS View Post
    Probably still the height of fashion in Yorkshire!!
    See above, that was just a normal day in Wakefield.


  22. #171
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    The prettier side of the Erewash
    Posts
    15,113

    Default Re: James McClean

    My mum's uncle lay badly injured - presumed dead - under a tarpaulin on the battlefield in Flanders for 4 days before being picked up by the Germans. They treated his stomach injury but he never regained full use of his hands.
    He came home, married, had kids but died in his early 50s.

    Another of her uncles was a mechanic in the RAF, he was in Germany after WWII had finished. A spare seat came up on an earlier plane home than planned which he never should have been on, he took it and the plane crashed on take off and he was killed.

    My granddad on my dad's side was actually my dad's stepdad. His real dad was killed in WWII but I don't know how or where or when.


  23. #172
    Sexual Tyrannosaurus
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Behind you
    Posts
    40,652

    Default Re: James McClean

    If you're bothered you can search the records for his name.


  24. #173
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    'ull
    Posts
    9,517

    Default Re: James McClean

    My dad’s dad was much older than my maternal grandad (hence why he died long before I was born). According to my Dad he was too old to fight in the second but too young in the first. Lucky him I say!! He did have two older brothers who fought in the First World War though. One was maimed in Belgium and discharged but I’m not sure what year. The other was killed in what is now Iraq. My dad has his army ID and his regimental cavalry sword which was passed down. My dad used to have the sword next to his bed the nutter. I used to play with it as a kid. I guess it’s in the loft now.

    I’m very lucky as for some reason my other grandad gave me his 2nd world war medals in about 1986 a year before he died. My 3 cousins and sister where all jealous. I was only 5 at the time so didn’t make a play for them.

    Last edited by GOBIAS; 12-11-18 at 08:26.

  25. #174
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    7,281

    Default Re: James McClean

    Quote Originally Posted by Wes' Organ View Post
    See above, that was just a normal day in Wakefield.
    Lard thinks this post is magic , it made him laugh as much as an episode of runaround.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •