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  1. #26

    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Le Juif Rouge View Post
    There is actually a tree called "Forest Pansy". My Dirty Leeds mate has one in his garden and likes to take the piss.

    https://plants.wemakedirtlookgood.co...t-pansy-redbud
    Looks very nice actually

    “All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies, and whenever they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you, digger, listener, runner, prince with the swift warning. Be cunning and full of tricks and your people shall never be destroyed.”

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  3. #27
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Looking to plant a small number of saplings when we move.
    Thought a couple of silver birch, maybe an oak and maybe a sweet chestnut.
    Any special considerations?
    What about sourcing the trees?


  4. #28
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    I'm still picking sprouts from the veggie plot, still going well.


  5. #29
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Sinister View Post
    Looking to plant a small number of saplings when we move.
    Thought a couple of silver birch, maybe an oak and maybe a sweet chestnut.
    Any special considerations?
    What about sourcing the trees?
    Amount of space. All the trees you mention get big. Stake em for the first couple of growing seasons, get decent guards if you have lots of rabbits or squirrels.
    Another option that I recommend to people is a rowan - compact, with lovely clusters of flowers in spring, then bright red berries which the birds love in autumn and winter.
    As for sourcing, you could get the seeds from the woods or a friends garden. Or they may have unwanted saplings. Otherwise, a good local tree nursery is the best bet.


  6. #30
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Corgettes, Jalapenos, some Petunias came through today in th heated propagator.

    I'm like a big kid at this time of year - the wonder that seeds bring!

    We shall meet again before long to march to new triumphs - Giuseppe Garibaldi

  7. #31
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    What would you lot put in these barrel pots? We had wild flowers seeds last year but some bolted and took over making them a mess. Non of them get much sun, apart from the middle one in the height of summer.

    [QUOTE=Barry;2870882]Ive only met Andy....last week actually and can confirm he is in 2nd place in sexiest fucker on here stakes.[/QUOTE]

  8. #32
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Creeping Jenny, maybe with a hardy grass like Japanese Forest Grass or a Yukka.

    Low maintenance, but all year round interest. Will need feeding one of year.


  9. #33
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. MariAndy!s View Post
    What would you lot put in these barrel pots? We had wild flowers seeds last year but some bolted and took over making them a mess. Non of them get much sun, apart from the middle one in the height of summer.
    hydrangea would look good , you leave the old flower heads on all over winter then prune early spring , easy to look after just water them .
    Or like has been said a Yukka or Cordeline.
    Any shrub really , or you could just go with bedding and change it twice a year.

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk


  10. #34
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by lard View Post
    hydrangea would look good , you leave the old flower heads on all over winter then prune early spring , easy to look after just water them .
    Or like has been said a Yukka or Cordeline.
    Any shrub really , or you could just go with bedding and change it twice a year.

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk
    Or you can go the herb route , Lavender etc

    Sent from my Wileyfox Swift using Tapatalk


  11. #35
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    I still haven't recovered from losing six chilli plants to aphids a few years ago. Some cool stuff too, Trinidad Scorpion, Habanero, Cayenne...

    I became obsessed, rushing back from work to spray the plants to kill the fuckers. It was like that dude in the film 'Leon' with his beloved plant.

    Bout time Forest stopped ruining weekends. - Barry

  12. #36

    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    What's the view on talking to them? Do folk think that works?

    Apparently, some plants prefer tea & pee to water too?


  13. #37
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Alf-ugginblowupyourbakery View Post
    What's the view on talking to them? Do folk think that works?

    Apparently, some plants prefer tea & pee to water too?
    I don't talk to plants. But I posted a link in Science thread to a story about experiments to plants having consciousness.

    All plants love ammonia, pee has it in varying amounts.

    I have a piss can in my polytunnel that I let break down and it gets worked into my tomato bed at the beginning of the season.

    It's smells exactly like the Comfrey tea I brew over the growing season for feeding.

    Tea from a teapot is probably an old wives tale.


  14. #38
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Alf-ugginblowupyourbakery View Post
    What's the view on talking to them? Do folk think that works?

    Apparently, some plants prefer tea & pee to water too?
    Talking to plants to help them grow is a flakey hippie myth.

    Additives like Tea and Pee change the nature of the soil, so it depends on what the plants like. I always piss on my compost heap because male urine is good from breaking down the compost.


  15. #39

    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Unity View Post
    I don't talk to plants. But I posted a link in Science thread to a story about experiments to plants having consciousness.

    All plants love ammonia, pee has it in varying amounts.

    I have a piss can in my polytunnel that I let break down and it gets worked into my tomato bed at the beginning of the season.

    It's smells exactly like the Comfrey tea I brew over the growing season for feeding.

    Tea from a teapot is probably an old wives tale.
    Being a bit of a spiritualist, and with this info in mind, I'm gonna make an effort to pee on the plants at least once a day now, and have a little chat with them when I do.

    The Xmas tree is also in the garden now, and they are very thirsty plants, so it'll encourage me to drink more water too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Le Juif Rouge View Post
    Talking to plants to help them grow is a flakey hippie myth.

    Additives like Tea and Pee change the nature of the soil, so it depends on what the plants like. I always piss on my compost heap because male urine is good from breaking down the compost.
    It may not make them grow physically, but even if it just helps them grow spiritually it may be worth it?

    Pissing outside is always more fun if we're being honest isn't it.


  16. #40
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Alf-ugginblowupyourbakery View Post
    Being a bit of a spiritualist, and with this info in mind, I'm gonna make an effort to pee on the plants at least once a day now, and have a little chat with them when I do.

    It may not make them grow physically, but even if it just helps them grow spiritually it may be worth it?

    Pissing outside is always more fun if we're being honest isn't it.
    My Mrs has always loved growing flowering plants and she is very much the "loving and caring" sort, but she has never found any connection regarding talking to plants and their growth. I am actually more mystically inclined than my Mrs, and my veggies do better than her flowering plants and I never talk to my plants.

    It is a well known fact that with both Avocado and Walnut trees you have to beat the shit out them with a piece of 4x2 every year to get them to fruit well. Remember the old English saying? "A dog, a wife and a walnut tree, the more you beat 'em the better they be." I love telling feminists that.


  17. #41
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Apart from all the usual fruit and veg, i'm a keen Dahlia grower. (mainly cactus and decorative) Dahlias seem to have fallen out of favour in the modern flower bed.


  18. #42

    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by rockabilly View Post
    Dahlias seem to have fallen out of favour in the modern flower bed.
    They should have never have shot "Bobby Tops" Ewing.

    The watering can scene with his wife Palm was when it died.


  19. #43
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by rockabilly View Post
    Apart from all the usual fruit and veg, i'm a keen Dahlia grower. (mainly cactus and decorative) Dahlias seem to have fallen out of favour in the modern flower bed.
    I have a few dahlias, all of the dark-leaved variety - Bishop of Aukland and similar varieties.

    I wonder if their decline is because they're not good container flowers?


  20. #44
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Unity View Post
    I have a few dahlias, all of the dark-leaved variety - Bishop of Aukland and similar varieties.

    I wonder if their decline is because they're not good container flowers?
    I personally think it's because they are too much bother for the 'modern day gardener'. Lifting tubers, storing, replanting, staking and feeding.

    Also there seems to many fashions and trends in Garden centres too.

    I've grown quiet a few dahlias in containers, as long they are well fed and watered they do great.

    At the moment i'm chitting my tubers on a warm window sill, and will be taking cuttings off them in a few weeks.


  21. #45
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Alf-ugginblowupyourbakery View Post
    They should have never have shot "Bobby Tops" Ewing.

    The watering can scene with his wife Palm was when it died.



  22. #46
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by rockabilly View Post
    I personally think it's because they are too much bother for the 'modern day gardener'. Lifting tubers, storing, replanting, staking and feeding.

    Also there seems to many fashions and trends in Garden centres too.

    I've grown quiet a few dahlias in containers, as long they are well fed and watered they do great.

    At the moment i'm chitting my tubers on a warm window sill, and will be taking cuttings off them in a few weeks.
    Mine are dormant in the polytunnel. Probably start waking them soon.


  23. #47
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Potted on everything I've got going today except for some petunias.

    Will sow more seed tomorrow. Mainly flowers, for beds and baskets.


  24. #48
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Any ideas how to stop my dog's piss killing my grass?
    I know that it is the concentration of nitrates that do it but is there a type of grass that thrives on excessive nitrates of a treatment to neutralise them?


  25. #49
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    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Wes' Organ View Post
    Any ideas how to stop my dog's piss killing my grass?
    I know that it is the concentration of nitrates that do it but is there a type of grass that thrives on excessive nitrates of a treatment to neutralise them?
    Kill your dog instead, problem solved.

    Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk


  26. #50

    Default Re: Gardener's Delight

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Sinister View Post
    Looking to plant a small number of saplings when we move.
    Thought a couple of silver birch, maybe an oak and maybe a sweet chestnut.
    Any special considerations?
    What about sourcing the trees?

    The Woodland Trust is a great source of native trees, they provide different packages of saplings including stakes and protectors for first few years.


 

 

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