Welcome to the LTLF Forest Forum.
Page 57 of 57 FirstFirst ... 747555657
Results 1,401 to 1,425 of 1425

Thread: Forest Early History

      
  1. #1401
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,158

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Possibly the craziest article I've read! Moaning about winning the top division!


  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Posts
    Many

  3. #1402

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by garibaldi View Post
    Possibly the craziest article I've read! Moaning about winning the top division!
    I think I understand what he's getting at though. He's had his heros for 25 years, and suddenly they are being deposed by another set of players.

    I had the opposite problem having been around in the seventies then seeing us about 20 years later in the third tier.

    You see it said on here from time to time that the team of 1977-78 wouldn't be able to live with the teams now. There is no way of knowing it whether it's true or not as were they coming to their peak now they would have been exposed to completely different training methods so would be fitter assuming they were making the first team. What you could assume is that they would still have their footballing brains, so should be good players from that point of view.

    However fit the players of today are, I'm not sure how well they would have played in the winters of the late seventies when goalmouths were quagmires, the balls soaked up the water and weighed much heavier than today's, the tackles were heavier and there was only one substitute per team per game. I suspect many of today's top players would have struggled to get through games.

    Teams are of their times and we all have our favourites.


  4. #1403

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    With all the discussion of drainage, river levels, water tables etc. following the Reading game postponement, this comment from Ken Smales in the programme for the Arges Ptesti EC tie on 24/10/79 is interesting. (The Executive (BC) Stand was being built at the time.)
    "After tonight's match the contractors have 10 clear days before the next game, so work will commence on the pump-house for the drains. One of the problems facing us at the City Ground is that we are below the level of the drains in the surrounding streets and everything has to be pumped out. There is no natural fall."


  5. #1404

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Ref doing his inspection on the day of the Man City FA Cup game 21 Jan 1978. The water was up to his ankles he said. It was called off.


    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #1405
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Canada/Mexico
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Red Till Dead View Post
    I think I understand what he's getting at though. He's had his heros for 25 years, and suddenly they are being deposed by another set of players.

    I had the opposite problem having been around in the seventies then seeing us about 20 years later in the third tier.

    You see it said on here from time to time that the team of 1977-78 wouldn't be able to live with the teams now. There is no way of knowing it whether it's true or not as were they coming to their peak now they would have been exposed to completely different training methods so would be fitter assuming they were making the first team. What you could assume is that they would still have their footballing brains, so should be good players from that point of view.

    However fit the players of today are, I'm not sure how well they would have played in the winters of the late seventies when goalmouths were quagmires, the balls soaked up the water and weighed much heavier than today's, the tackles were heavier and there was only one substitute per team per game. I suspect many of today's top players would have struggled to get through games.

    Teams are of their times and we all have our favourites.
    If they were using refs from the 70's today's teams would be out of luck, they'd be pulling on player's shirts, trying their "professional fouls" and then punched in the face for it by players from the 70's, ref wouldn't even bother signaling play on. The physical nature of play from back then would shock a lot of today's princesses.


  7. #1406

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by nffclsr View Post
    If they were using refs from the 70's today's teams would be out of luck, they'd be pulling on player's shirts, trying their "professional fouls" and then punched in the face for it by players from the 70's, ref wouldn't even bother signaling play on. The physical nature of play from back then would shock a lot of today's princesses.
    I suspect that many would find an elbow in the ribs would cure their shirt pulling habits.


  8. #1407
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,158

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Red Till Dead View Post
    I think I understand what he's getting at though. He's had his heros for 25 years, and suddenly they are being deposed by another set of players.

    I had the opposite problem having been around in the seventies then seeing us about 20 years later in the third tier.

    You see it said on here from time to time that the team of 1977-78 wouldn't be able to live with the teams now. There is no way of knowing it whether it's true or not as were they coming to their peak now they would have been exposed to completely different training methods so would be fitter assuming they were making the first team. What you could assume is that they would still have their footballing brains, so should be good players from that point of view.

    However fit the players of today are, I'm not sure how well they would have played in the winters of the late seventies when goalmouths were quagmires, the balls soaked up the water and weighed much heavier than today's, the tackles were heavier and there was only one substitute per team per game. I suspect many of today's top players would have struggled to get through games.

    Teams are of their times and we all have our favourites.
    If Forest get promoted and win the league next season eclipsing Cloughie's domestic achievement and a Forest fan moans about it because it's spoilt his memories of Highfield Road, then he's an idiot.


  9. #1408
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    The leafy, rarified suburb of Sneinton, Nottingham.
    Posts
    10,612

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by garibaldi View Post
    Possibly the craziest article I've read! Moaning about winning the top division!
    The way I read it, I'm convinced that there was a sizeable dose of irony in that article.


  10. #1409
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9,665

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Takes me back to Div III(S). Happy days. Norwich were in the same division and they had a Northern Irish international in their team. An international player in a third division team I thought. He must be good. Shows how much I knew about football then as the Irish used to get tonked every game.

    A more innocent time for me.


  11. #1410

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Well I didn't manage the whole of the 77-78 season yet but I've uploaded a new copy of volume 3 to Dropbox which has the 77-78 season up to 31st January 1978. There are over a hundred pages for that season with match reports and news stories so it will keep you busy for a while if you're bored.


  12. #1411

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    (Football Post, Saturday, October 14, 1950)

    F. P. Sporting Gallery

    Geoff Thomas – Nottm Forest

    Put Geoff Thomas on a football field, and for 90 minutes he will give of his best. But at one time there was a position he heartily disliked, and it was full back, where later he was to make a name for himself.

    It took much pleading, and persuasion by the Forest manager, Billy Walker, to get him to change from right half-back, and he only moved on the stipulation that if he did not like the position after three games he could return to the middle line. Geoff is serving up some brilliant displays at left-back these days so it must be assumed that he has mastered his old aversion.

    His reason for not wishing to change was a compliment to the skill team of youngsters built up by the Forest manager. It was not uncommon to win by double figures, and I knew that if I played in the defence I would probably not get a kick. That was not my idea of a game.”

    Geoff has always enjoyed being in the thick of the fray – even when the nearby waste ground was the football pitch, and the goalposts were jealously guarded batter tins thrown out by the local fish fryer.

    He was only young when his family moved from Barrow-on-Trent to Derby, and he graduated through the Pear Tree School side to the Derby Boys eleven. It was while he was playing for the Pear Tree Youth Club, a mere stripling of 15½, that Geoff came to the notice of Nottingham clubs.

    Surprisingly enough it was at Meadow Lane that he was called into the office, handed a pen, and told he could become a Notts. County player if he so wished. But Geoff had other ideas.

    This is what the boy told Mr. Wilf Fisher, the Magpies’ secretary: I have always wanted to play for Forest. I am having a trial with them next week. If they don’t want me I will return.” But he never did.

    After appearances with Forest’s colts he played his first game against Notts County at 17 – seven seasons ago.

    When Geoff is not training at the City Ground he can always be found on the golf course. Just over a week ago he finished joint runner up in the Professional Footballers’ Golf tourney at Liverpool and is hoping that when the event is staged in Nottingham next year, to improve on this record.


  13. #1412
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    The leafy, rarified suburb of Sneinton, Nottingham.
    Posts
    10,612

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Thanks for finding and posting that piece Nicola.

    It was particularly heartwarming to read that Geoff wasn't presented with any dilemmas about choosing us over the Sadpies.


  14. #1413
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    9,611

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Thanks so much IRTD. Couldn't have asked for something with more detail and a feel like the above on Geoff.

    I sometimes forget what a history chamber we have here and I love reading up on our history. Thanks so much.


  15. #1414

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by BryanRoy View Post
    Thanks so much IRTD. Couldn't have asked for something with more detail and a feel like the above on Geoff.

    I sometimes forget what a history chamber we have here and I love reading up on our history. Thanks so much.
    My pleasure. When people ask questions, I often find things that I might have overlooked as I gather things for my scrapbook. I had transcribed a number of the Football Post Sporting Gallery pieces but had missed this one somehow, so thank you.


  16. #1415
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9,665

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    My only complaint about our history is that there is so much of it. I never seem to find the time to properly read through all the super stuff people post, particularly your stuff IRTD.


  17. #1416

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    (Football Post, Saturday, November 17, 1951)

    F. P. Sporting Gallery

    Bobby McKinlay – Nottingham Forest


    When Manager W. H. Walker, of Nottingham Forest, refers to his promising players, one of the foremost names mentioned is that of Scottish born centre-half Bobby McKinlay. Since he joined the club two years ago he has made remarkable progress, and may eventually succeed Gager.

    Nephew of that grand Forest player of pre-war days, Billy McKinlay, the Fifeshire youngster's ambition is to serve the club as well as did his uncle. As he is only 19 he has many years ahead in which to achieve his aim.

    Already he has made one first team appearance against Coventry City on October 27th. “It was a bit of an ordeal," he remarked, but there is no doubt he gained valuable experience in that match for, although the centre-forward opposed to him performed the hat-trick, this was not entirely Bobby's fault. The post-match verdict was: “A useful first game.”

    Back in the reserves again Bobby is serving his apprenticeship amongst players eager to help him. His keenness is a big asset, and his fine physique another, for already he is regarded as being as tough as nails.

    It is rather strange therefore that a spot of ear trouble caused him to be exempted from military service. He learned his football at the Lochgelly local school. At that time he was a centre-half, but when he moved into junior football with Bowhill Rovers it was to play as an outside-right.

    One Saturday afternoon his uncle saw him in action and recommended him to Forest. A letter from Billy about a player was enough to make Mr. Walker act, and Bobby visited the City Ground for a trial when he was 16 1/2. He played two games as a winger for the A team, and then returned to Scotland for six months. The day he was 17 he signed as a professional and joined the Forest staff.

    It was decided that Bobby would make a better half-back, and he was tried both at wing half and as a pivot.

    “My favourite position these days is centre-half," he says. According to officials of the club it is his best position as well, and they are confident that, barring accidents, there is a big future for this young Scot


  18. #1417
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    9,611

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Thanks IRTD. The 40s/50s era is very difficult to determine Forest juniors just like the Bobby example above. The war cross over also made it difficult. It got more clearer in the 60s and definitely when apprentices were being signed on for the first time in the early 60s-mid 60s.

    The channel Islanders also an interesting one. Bill Whare is easy because of the war. So we were his first real club when he debuted at 23. Geoff Vowden looks like he joined us at 19 so he wasn't a junior. Flip Le Flem though I seem to have found he was a Forest junior.

    Definite Forest Juniors

    1960/61

    David Pleat (15), Peter Grummitt (18) & Henry Newton (16)



    1961/62

    P.Collins, John Coleman (15), Ian Storey-Moore (16), David Pleat (16)




    Peter 'Tank' Hindley, John Winfield & Sammy Chapman would have been around this group too. ISM was still good mates with Tank Hindley as the grew up together at Forest and then shared digs I remember him saying.

    Last edited by BryanRoy; 22-11-19 at 11:53.

  19. #1418

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    I came across this early piece by Billy Walker in his Villa playing days that talked about his early footballing days. I thought some might find it interesting.

    (The Devon and Exeter Gazette, Saturday, January 25, 1930)

    INSIDE-FORWARD.

    Masters and Their Methods.

    BY "BILLY" WALKER
    .

    Exactly how much, and exactly what, we inherit when we arrive on this planet is matter which must be left to the people who are much more learned in these things than I am. But it would seem now, as I look back on my football career, that there is more than a bit truth in the old proverb which declares that "what's bred in the bone must come out in the washing"—or something to that effect. My father was a footballer, and, so far as have been able to gather, was quite good footballer. Anyway, he played for Wolverhampton Wanderers in their hey-day. Possibly, there nothing peculiar in the fact that though my father had been a footballer himself was most anxious to prevent me from following in his footsteps. My mind goes back to my very early days, and I have distinct recollection of my parent giving me advice on these lines : "Billy, my lad," he used to say, "go down the mine, go to sea, be a clerk, try farming, try anything except football as a profession." In my early days, too, the discouragement was not entirely by way of advice. I was discouraged from talking about football, and attempts were made to prevent me from playing the game at all seriously. But when I was still very young I used to sneak off to watch my father play for the Wolves, and when I grew up I found that I had a real passion for the game. Still my father tried to discourage me; to tell me that I ought to do other things. What was bred in the bone, however, would come out. One day I succeeded in persuading my father to come to a junior match to see me play. I think that he was secretly pleased with what I did during the game, for I happened to have a good day, scoring two three goals. When it was over I said my parent: "Now what about letting me be footballer?" He smiled a resigned sort of smile, and then added: "Oh, well, if you must I suppose you must. good luck to you."

    MONEY NOT EVERYTHING.

    The good luck wishes were repeated when there came to me an offer to sign on for the Villa, and so into football I went, not because I was encouraged to become a footballer, but because it was in me to play the game. And here perhaps, in passing, I may put in a line of thought which is often overlooked. It is frequently said the professional footballer that the only thing he cares about in connexion with the game is the money he receives for playing the game. Now, there is no getting away from the fact that the money useful. In this something less than perfect world you must have a certain amount of the "root of all evil" if you are to exist at all. But I must insist that it is a libel on footballers generally to say that the cash which they receive for playing the game is their chief consideration. Possibly, this may be so in regard to some fellows when they enter into the game, but I believe most firmly that the fellows who get on in football the only ones - are those who love the game for the game's sake, and to whom the cash associated with it is more than a necessary incidental. The man whose heart is not in football won't get on in football. The man whose heart is in it has chance. Of course, I was fortunate the start of my real footballing career to get my first chance with the Villa, and to get it at a time when the club had some fine players of experience; helpful fellows, and were wanting youngsters to fit in. It was in the first normal season after the war that I got into the Villa first eleven for the first time. How the fellows in the team of that time helped me. encouraged me, pulled me through, if I may put it that way. Luck was on my side is more than one way. I have explained that I had the sort of colleagues who did nothing but help. Well, in the very first season in which was a member of the team we had one of our good Cup years; got to the final, and after a desperate struggle with Huddersfield Town our opponents - a struggle which lasted for two hours - we got through by the only goal in the game. Of course I was a centre-forward when I first played for the Villa, and it was also in this position that I was given my first International cap. I think my father forgave me everything when I was chosen to lead England's attack for the first time.

    THE " W " FORMATION.

    Since then I have changed position; have played for England at inside-left, and have become the recognised inside-left in the Aston Villa team. Perhaps the change over from the centre to an inside position is a natural development for a footballer not specially built to stand the trials and tribulations which assail the centre-forward. Anyway, the Villa folk thought that they could better utilise my services as an inside wingman, and there I have done my best. At times I used to think that to fill the centre-forward berth satisfactorily was difficult enough, but as the years have rolled by, and with the years there have come changes over the game, I am beginning to think that the inside wing-man's place has more difficulties than any other. There has been so much discussion of late on what is called the "W" formation of the attack, and argument as to whether the inside wing-man should keep behind the other forwards, that it is not up to me to say much on this question. One thing I would point out, however, and that is that there is nothing new in the idea the inside wing-man falling back when his side is attacked. It always has been done, and in my opinion it will always be necessary that it should be done. But while the foregoing is true, I think it is gradually being realised that when the inside wing-men fall back and stay back, such tactics become a source of weakness rather than of strength. Perhaps the safest way to put it - and the clearest - is to say that modern ideas tend to the view that the inside wingman should be back when there is work to be done in the rear - useful defensive work, plus constructive scheming - but that when there are goals to be scored the inside wing-man should be up among the goal-scorers. The inside wing-men of the future will, in my view, be workers first and foremost. They will be skilful footballers in the second place, and they will be of the never-tired variety by way of addition. They will be like the pendulum in the old grandfather clock - swinging backwards and forwards. The inside man has a hard job to-day: he is going to have a harder job in the future.

    Last edited by I'm Red Till Dead; 07-12-19 at 11:41.

  20. #1419
    It's all about mid-table...
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wetherspoons
    Posts
    17,158

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Thats Brilliant, thanks for putting it up.


  21. #1420

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    I wonder if this guy ever regretted his decision?


    (The Journal (Newcastle), Saturday, February 04, 1978 )

    Moors star snubs Clough

    Reilly unimpressed by Forest offer


    SPENNYMOOR’S striker Kevin Reilly has turned his back on Brian Clough’s treble-chasers Nottingham Forest.

    As Spenymoor bid for a place in the last 16 of the FA Trophy at Whitby today, it’s odds on that a Forest scout will be checking on Reilly again.

    Reilly is one of the reasons that Moors manager Kenny Banks is banking on his side making amends for their 6-1 FA Cup exit at Rotherham by going all the way to Wembley in the Trophy.

    But Forest are going to be disappointed in their efforts to persuade Reilly to give up his career at Smart and Browns and his football at Brewery Field for the glamour of the First Division.

    Forest watched Reilly in Moors’ last game three weeks ago when they toppled Gainsbrough Trinity in the Trophy for the right to face fellow Northern Leaguers Whitby.

    Kenny Banks revealed: “They’ve been in touch to try to get Kevin to play in their reserve side on trial basis. But the lad isn’t interested.”

    He has a lucrative career outside football and is happy where he is. Other clubs have tried and failed and I’m sure the same will apply to Forest.”

    “If Forest came along with a fabulous offer he couldn’t refuse that’s the only way to make his head turn. Otherwise he’s not keen. It may sound amazing but that’s the situation.”

    Note: Smart and Brown appears to have been an engineering firm making Fridges, washing machines and lighting. It was a big employer in Spennymoor at the time.


  22. #1421
    Left Winger
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Lufthansa Business Lounge
    Posts
    80,966

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    That’ll have aged like milk!

    „I believe in socialism because it seems more humanitarian, rather than every man for himself and 'I'm alright jack' and all those arsehole businessmen with all the loot. I made up my mind from viewing society from that angle. That's where I'm from and there's where I've made my decisions from. That's why I believe in socialism“

    — Joe Strummer

  23. #1422

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    In a couple of early reports, Forest were referred to with the nickname of the 'Lambs.' I wonder if this is a reference to the Nottingham Lambs street gang involved in the rigging of the 1865 election.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02snry4


  24. #1423
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    966

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    I always thought County were known as the Lambs?


  25. #1424

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B View Post
    I always thought County were known as the Lambs?
    I'm sure I've seen a couple of early games where Forest were referred to as the Lambs. I've seen Derby given that nickname too.

    Here's one from a report on the 1898 Cup Final v Derby where I'm sure that the Lambs reference is referring to Forest.

    There was no doubting that Notts were showing the better football, and in the next few minutes Fryer and his backs had an anxious time. Capes and Forman each sent in fine shots, while a long dropping one from Ritchie gave Fryer an armful.
    A free kick to the Lambs enabled them to maintain the pressure, but McInnes was too closely attended by Leiper to get in a shot, and the ball went wide. A grand piece of work by Richards led to another determined attack on the Derby goal, Spouncer sending in a splendid centre, which Benbow just failed to convert, and in the tussle was injured, a further stoppage being necessary.
    McQueen next essayed a run on his wing, but Forman stopped his career, and from a free-kick Capes got an opening, and with a splendid shot along the ground, completely beat Fryer, and opened the scoring for the Notts men. This was after 20 minutes play, and the Notts supporters showed their delight in unmistakeable fashion.
    There was more pretty football by the Lambs on the restart, while when the Derby forwards threatened danger they found the opposing backs as safe as the proverbial rock, and, moreover, as cool as a cucumber. A good centre to McQueen saw John Goodall robbed as he was preparing for a shot, while another fine centre from the Derby left was caught and thrown away by Allsopp in grand fashion. At this stage Derby improved, though there was still a lack of combination in their play, which was so marked a feature on the opposing side.

    Last edited by I'm Red Till Dead; 10-12-19 at 22:15.

  26. #1425
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Speluncarrum Domus
    Posts
    9,775

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    The moment we blew the FA cup and maybe closer finish to the league title



    I fell in love with football as I was later to fall in love with women,. Suddenly, uncritically giving no thought to the pain it could bring. - Nick Hornby

 

 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •