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Thread: Forest Early History

      
  1. #1101

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by BryanRoy View Post
    Forest team before a game in Buenos Aires in 1905

    Why can I see this image on my tablet, but not on my laptop?


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  3. #1102

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Forest chairman Jack Brentnall selling tickets to the boxing at the City Ground in his music store (From the Post 18th June, 1943)



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    Last edited by I'm Red Till Dead; 07-03-19 at 22:31.

  4. #1103
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Red Till Dead View Post
    Why can I see this image on my tablet, but not on my laptop?
    hmmmm not sure ? Still like that ?


  5. #1104
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Red Till Dead View Post
    Why can I see this image on my tablet, but not on my laptop?
    Same. I can't see any images or links on my laptop when they're linked to twitter (as this one is).


  6. #1105
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    1946/47 Bradford Park Avenue v Nottingham Forest programme






  7. #1106
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Thanks BryanRoy that takes me back, though it was actually just before my football time. It just reminds us of Bradford Park Avenue and scraping the beard off with a blue Gillette blade.

    And King's Lynn played in the Midland League when I supported them in the 50s; we had some keen games against Posh in those days, too.

    How simple and innocent those days seem now.


  8. #1107

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by Professor Wolfgang Schnell BSc. PhD. View Post
    Same. I can't see any images or links on my laptop when they're linked to twitter (as this one is).
    That might be it. My tablet has a Twitter password saved and would probably auto login where my laptop doesn't.


  9. #1108

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    The Scrapbook word document where I keep all these transcriptions of Forest in the newspapers has been crashing on me the last couple of days. I've noticed that the document size is now over 33mb and has over 394,000 words. Are there any limits to word that I might be hitting does anyone know? I'm using Word 2007 on Windows 7. Am I going to have to break it down into volumes? Whilst I'd rather not as it will lessen the effectiveness of the index, if needs must then I will have to I guess.

    Chris, any ideas?

    Last edited by I'm Red Till Dead; 09-03-19 at 00:22. Reason: Corrected word count from 360,000

  10. #1109
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Red Till Dead View Post
    The Scrapbook word document where I keep all these transcriptions of Forest in the newspapers has been crashing on me the last couple of days. I've noticed that the document size is now over 33mb and has over 394,000 words. Are there any limits to word that I might be hitting does anyone know? I'm using Word 2007 on Windows 7. Am I going to have to break it down into volumes? Whilst I'd rather not as it will lessen the effectiveness of the index, if needs must then I will have to I guess.

    Chris, any ideas?
    That’s very large for a single Word document. Especially in Word 2007 (the newer versions are better at handling larger documents).

    Microsoft‘s products are never the most stable anyway. I know the pdf version takes a couple of seconds to open even on my MacBook!

    „The revolution will inevitably awaken in the British working class the deepest passions which have been diverted along artificial channels with the aid of football.“

  11. #1110

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by chriscl View Post
    That’s very large for a single Word document. Especially in Word 2007 (the newer versions are better at handling larger documents).

    Microsoft‘s products are never the most stable anyway. I know the pdf version takes a couple of seconds to open even on my MacBook!
    Thanks Chris. I think I will have to break it down. A lot of the info covers the first 25 years (about 40% page wise) so initially I'll try breaking it down into the first 25 year and the rest and see how it goes.


  12. #1111
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by valspoodle View Post
    Thanks BryanRoy that takes me back, though it was actually just before my football time. It just reminds us of Bradford Park Avenue and scraping the beard off with a blue Gillette blade.

    And King's Lynn played in the Midland League when I supported them in the 50s; we had some keen games against Posh in those days, too.

    How simple and innocent those days seem now.
    No worries mate.

    Not so long ago Bryn and I were actually talking about them (Bradford Park Avenue) and their demise. Which basically got bad fast not long after the above.


  13. #1112

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Anyone remember Tandem Tickets?

    In 1980, Football was struggling with falling attendances probably caused by hooliganism in the game and a recession outside it. A report in the Belfast Telegraph of December 16th 1980 looked at what some teams were doing to try to draw the crowds back. Amongst the examples was this little piece on Forest

    Even European champions Nottingham Forest, admittedly having a poor season by Brian Clough’s standards have had to offer incentives for people to watch them. They have pegged next season’s charges, offered cheap season tickets, and, in a bid to tempt the new generation, let accompanied youngsters in at a concessionary rate.

    “Our tandem tickets have encouraged dads to bring their sons, and even mums with their daughters,” said secretary Ken Smales.

    In his book "Forest: The first 125 years," Ken Smales mentions that a pack of three player cards were given away with the tickets. He also mentioned Tricycle Tickets. Does anyone know what the difference was. Was it mum, dad and a child, or one adult and two children?

    Last edited by I'm Red Till Dead; 14-03-19 at 10:32.

  14. #1113

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    We tend to forget that, throughout its history, the club is more than just the players. In the old days there was also the Committee

    (Nottingham Evening Post, Friday, August 30, 1935)



    Nottingham Forest, in this their 70th birthday season, continue fortunate of such a loyal committee as the following: Standing (left to right): Messrs. E. R. Fraser, W. H Stevens, A. M. Parr, H. Butler, F. B. Pilkington;
    Sitting, Messrs. G. N. Watson (hon. Sec.), H. R. Cobbin (chairman), and Frank Forman.

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  15. #1114

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    They were just ordinary Jim's back in 1957 in their build up to the Liverpool v Forest game at Anfield. With Forest in the race for promotion to the First Division, The Liverpool Echo featured this picture of Forest striker Jim Barrett.



    Although we lost this battle three - one, we did win the war by clinching the runners up spot, with Liverpool finishing 3rd. Leicester took the top spot that year.

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  16. #1115
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Red Till Dead View Post
    They were just ordinary Jim's back in 1957 in their build up to the Liverpool v Forest game at Anfield. With Forest in the race for promotion to the First Division, The Liverpool Echo featured this picture of Forest striker Jim Barrett.



    Although we lost this battle three - one, we did win the war by clinching the runners up spot, with Liverpool finishing 3rd. Leicester took the top spot that year.
    I remember that triumph, but in those days it was hard work keeping up with our progress.

    I was at boarding school in Norfolk, no radio, no connection to Nottingham and only the daily papers delivered to the school library to give me the merest hint of the result of the games. But it was worth it.


  17. #1116

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by valspoodle View Post
    I remember that triumph, but in those days it was hard work keeping up with our progress.

    I was at boarding school in Norfolk, no radio, no connection to Nottingham and only the daily papers delivered to the school library to give me the merest hint of the result of the games. But it was worth it.
    I had the same problem with the European runs etc as I was at Uni in Scotland at the time. I could never understand why Scottish newspapers didn't give us much space in the papers. I do remember them printing a story about Hartford leaving a couple of weeks after joining and wondering what was going on.


  18. #1117

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    A legend to be, cut down before he even reached his prime, Ernest Edwin Barlow, known as Ernie, played just 19 games for the club, but in that time he scored 8 goals including two hat-tricks.

    The last Forest event Barlow took part in appears to have been the Annual Sports event, on April 26th 1884 where he finished second in the 200 yard handicapped race where he started 12 yards ahead of the line. He finished 10 yards behind J. F. Bishop who also started 10 yards ahead of the line.

    (Sporting Life, Wednesday, September 24, 1884)

    DEATH OF A NOTTINGHAM FOREST FOOTBALL PLAYER.

    It is particularly painful, just as the first note of another football season has been sounded, to have to record the death of a young Nottingham player, who has taken a prominent part on the principal matches of one of the leading clubs of the town. Ernest E. Barlow, died yesterday, Friday of haemorrhage of the lungs, the culminating point of an attack of phthisis, which for some time past had laid him low. Wearing Forest colours, he played generously and skilfully on the right wing of the “reds” last season, and was undoubtedly “the coming man” in the team. A succession of chills caught in the football field threw him into a decline, and he succumbed to the insidious disease just as he had arrived upon the threshold of manhood. His death will be deeply deplored. – Nottingham Journal, September 20.

    Notes: 1. Phthisis - pulmonary tuberculosis or similar progressive wasting disease.


  19. #1118
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    It's good stuff in your 'labour of love' I'm Red Till, well played!

    And there's an title that really should be brought back... 'the coming man'. Will need an appropriate looking trophy though.

    I always enjoy seeing newspaper adverts from these sort of times, the wordings of an age gone by. "Telephone Nottingham 114". If only I could and they'd answer!


  20. #1119

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry-Balding Red View Post
    It's good stuff in your 'labour of love' I'm Red Till, well played!

    And there's an title that really should be brought back... 'the coming man'. Will need an appropriate looking trophy though.

    I always enjoy seeing newspaper adverts from these sort of times, the wordings of an age gone by. "Telephone Nottingham 114". If only I could and they'd answer!
    I hope people don't follow up the old ads. With my family tree / family historian hat on, I've seen adverts letting rooms in my house. The money would be nice, but I'm not sure that I would want a stranger in the house.


  21. #1120
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    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm Red Till Dead View Post
    I hope people don't follow up the old ads. With my family tree / family historian hat on, I've seen adverts letting rooms in my house. The money would be nice, but I'm not sure that I would want a stranger in the house.
    There's a strange bloke in my house. Keep catching sight of him in mirrors.

    How far have you got back family tree-wise I'm Red Till? I had a go and got back to around 1750 on my fathers side, at which point I was 'reasonably' sure I was looking at a record of the right person. Beyond that I'd have been conning myself. A lot easier, I hear, if you've got descendants with military history.


  22. #1121

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry-Balding Red View Post
    There's a strange bloke in my house. Keep catching sight of him in mirrors.

    How far have you got back family tree-wise I'm Red Till? I had a go and got back to around 1750 on my fathers side, at which point I was 'reasonably' sure I was looking at a record of the right person. Beyond that I'd have been conning myself. A lot easier, I hear, if you've got descendants with military history.


    It varies by line obviously, but 3 or 4 lines go back to the early-mid 1700's my mums line is one of those and there are two possibilities beyond that either they came from North Derbyshire or from Scotland as its one of those names that could be either and the timing is right for the Scottish invasion that reached Derby. He may not have gone back. Distant cousins claim to have Scottish heirlooms, though i've never seen anything. Another line has been traced back to the 1500s, and yet another line I have back to 1600 and could probably be traced back further if I got to Matlock as they hold some papers for that line.

    You're right though, The further back you go with the everyday families, the more it tends to be art than science as you can't be sure you have all the info you need, can you. Of course now there is DNA in the mix, more things may become clear.


  23. #1122

    Default Re: Forest Early History

    Heres something I just found which isn't football but is interesting nontheless.

    The Nottingham Journal offered free insurance for readers who were registered with them to have the Journal delivered. Sums to be paid include

    £250 if someone is killed in a lift whoe is not the lift controller
    £250 for a train passenger
    £250 for the loss of an arm above the wrist , or leg above the ankle, or the loss of sight in one eye.
    £250 for an injury in a plane or train crash were the person is permenantly unable to work
    £10 for an injury in a plane or train crash were the person isn't permanently disabled, or for a similar accident on a bus
    For non-professionals playing sport, £250 for death, £10 for fractures
    It also covered accidents in the home, on bikes, horse drawn carriages, in the street, drowning

    Fractures to children aged 5- 16 only gave rise to £2 payments for fractures

    All this for the price of getting the paper delivered which had a price of 1d., presumably the delevery cost too.


 

 

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